Parents - Frequently Asked Questions

Job possibilities exist for all students.  Something that may be surprising is that the majority of employers who post jobs on our online job positing site -- StocktonWorks -- do not specify a major when recruiting.  That is, they want an educated person -- and a particular major is secondary.  We know from research conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers that all employers want general skills such as technological competencies, interpersonal and communication skills.  For more specific information about these skills click here.

We have a plethora of links that will help students with their job search.  Click here for specific job listings.

Additionally, students are often served very well by attending Career Fairs.  We have several Career Fairs on our own campus.  We also list many Career Fairs hosted by others in various locations.

The Career Center provides comprehensive services to current students and alumni.  Our goal is to help students make a successful transition from education to the world of work.

Services provided include:

  • Career Advising
  • Choosing a Major and Minor
  • Exploring What You Can Do With Various Major
  • Resume Reviews
  • Internship Assistance
  • Interview and Job Search Preparation
  • On-Campus Recruiting
  • Online Database of Employers & Job Openings
  • Graduate School Information & Assistance
  • Career & Internship Fairs
  • Network of Alumni Mentors

Students interested in working on-campus should first look at their financial aid package to see if Federal Work-Study is included in the package.  The Federal Work-Study Program provides jobs for undergraduate and graduate students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay education expenses.  Many offices on Stockton's campus hire Federal Work-Study students every semester.  For any questions regarding the Federal Work-Study Program including your student's eligibility and a list of offices on-campus that typically hire Work-Study students please contact the Financial Aid Office.

Whether your student has Work-Study or does not the process for finding a job on-campus is the same.  The student should contact any office that he/she might be interested in working to see if they have any student positions available and inquire how to apply.  Some of the bigger employers on-campus for non-Work-Study students are Chartwell's Dining Service, the Bookstore, Athletics and Computer Services.  This list of offices that hire Work-Study students might also be a helpful list to those without Work-Study funds.

Students can find local part-time job listings on the Career Center's job and internship posting site - StocktonWorks. 

Yes!  Your student may make an appointment with a career advisor to discuss their options and build a strategy for exploring various majors.  Your student may also want to check out the Choosing Majors & Careers section of our website for additional resources and suggestions.
There is no set time when a student should start using the Career Center.  Some freshmen know exactly what they want to do and may not use the Career Center until their sophomore or junior year when they are ready to find an internship or begin working on their resume.  However freshmen who are undecided about their major or career possibilities should definitely make an appointment with a career advisor to begin the career exploration and decision-making process.  The Career Center has something to offer all Stockton students, freshmen through graduate students. 
Check out our Where Our Graduates Work pages to get a snapshot of where Stockton graduates have gotten jobs, landed internships or been accepted to graduate school.
The Career Center offers a few assessment inventories for students to identify interests, skills, and personality.  Our online self-assessment tool -- FOCUS -- helps students to learn more about their work preferences, personality, interests and what careers fit with those preferences.  Additionally, students can make an appointment with a career advisor to take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - a personality assessment.  Other online career assessment tools can be found here.

Students can start increasing their chances of finding a good full-time job their freshmen year.  Many students get part-time jobs either on or off-campus.  Part-time jobs are great for learning transferable skills (skills all employers look for such as teamwork, leadership, flexibility, time management, etc.).

Encourage your student to get involved on campus.  There are several ways in which a student can do that:  student organizations, student government, volunteer work, activities, Greek organizations and more.  For more information about getting involved on-campus, please check with the Office of Student Development or check the Campus Life page for other involvement opportunities for students.

Another way to enhance their chances of finding a good full-time job is to get an internship in their area of study, or in an area of strong career interest.  Often employers hire interns full-time after graduation.

Students need to utilize the Career Center.  We offer workshops and events that help students develop job search-related skills and connect with potential employers.  It's also important for them to make an appointment with a career advisor.  Students can make appointments with a career advisor at any time by calling the office at 609-652-4650.  Additionally, the Career Center website has a list of state and national job search engines that students can utilize 24/7.

Graduate school is not the place to postpone "real life" or decisions about a career direction.  Graduate programs are intense and demand that a student commit most of his/her time and energy to the study of a specific academic area.  The student should confirm his/her interests by talking with faculty members and graduate students in the area.  Check out websites and conferences or related professional associations.  Visit professionals in different career environments to see what the work is really like.  It is very important that your student gathers information from professionals in the field. 

Once your student has his/her area of interest decided; then it's time to narrow down the list of potential institutions.  When evaluating programs, consider admissions requirements, academic program emphasis, reputation/program quality, faculty, facilities, accreditation, cost, financial aid, location, size and post-grad school employment.  Your student may want to make an appointment with a career counselor and check out the resources and information on our Graduate School page.

 

Pay close attention to deadlines for applications and test dates.  Most schools require a copy of your student's college transcript, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of purpose or application essay.

If your student is interested in attending graduate school, have them make an appointment with a career advisor.  Career advisors can help with everything from reviewing personal statements to preparing for intereviews.  Our webpage on applying to Graduate School is also full of resources and information related to managing the application process.