Criminal Justice

  • Criminal Justice Program

    Criminal Justice Program

The mission of the Criminal Justice (CRIM) program at Stockton University is to provide students with an understanding of the criminal justice system from the perspective of the social sciences. Its primary focus is academic - an examination of an important aspect of American society - rather than training for specific roles in the criminal justice system. 

To achieve our mission, the program plans to: 

  • Have students learn different theories of crime and criminality and their applicability to criminal justice issues.
  • Have students understand principles of criminal justice research.
  • Have students apply basic statistical concepts.
  • Encourage students to think critically and evaluate the quality of sources of information.
  • Provide students with a greater understanding of the police and the issues confronting law enforcement.
  • Provide students with a greater understanding of the courts, legal system, and Constitution and the critical issues confronting these entities and their place in the criminal justice system and our society.
  • Provide students with a greater understanding of corrections and the issues confronting the corrections systems.
  • Teach students about the complex relationships between diverse groups and the U.S. criminal justice system.
  • Introduce students to comparative and global issues related to the criminal justice system.
  • Introduce students to ethical considerations in criminal justice work.
  • Prepare students to continue their education at the graduate level.
  • Expose students to topics in criminal justice through different modes of experiential learning.

Criminal Justice Program Vision

The Criminal Justice program vision is to provide a broad knowledge of the criminal justice system while providing students with content on the specific trends, challenges, and advances in the field.  In order to do that we:

  • Ensure our curriculum is current and course content is updated.
  • Assess content in all of our core courses, make adjustments, and report results back to the program.
  • Provide relevant programs and CJ career series sessions to our students.
  • Provide students with vital information and career opportunities via email, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.
  • Work together to create by-laws and a governing structure for our program to ensure all faculty have a voice.

 The program mission aligns with the university mission.

Program Concentrations


Criminal Justice students are not required to pursue a concentration, but may choose to focus on a particular area of interest. The program offers the following concentrations:

Forensic Psychology involves applying psychology to the field of criminal investigation and the law.


What will I learn?

  • Culpability states including insanity and competence to stand trial
  • Development of the criminal personality
  • Evaluation of the risk of reoffending
  • Testimony as an expert witness
  • Child custody evaluations

Where can I find jobs?

  • Federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), U.S. Secret Service, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).
  • Probation, parole, and correctional facilities
  • Mental health facilities
  • Group homes, family services, and juvenile justice agencies
  • Law enforcement offices; private security firms; insurance companies

Contact: 
Joshua Duntley, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G251, Phone: 609-626-3570, Email: joshua.duntley@stockton.edu

Kimberley Schanz, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Office: F128, Email: kimberley.schanz@stockton.edu

What courses do I need to take?

Foundation course requirements

  • Prerequisite: PSYC 1100 Introduction to Psychology and CRIM 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • PSYC 2211 Abnormal Psychology
  • CRIM 2114 Theories of Criminality
  • CRIM/PSYC 3120 Forensic Psychology

Electives: Students must take TWO:

  • PSYC 3145 Sex Crimes
  • PSYC 3646 Forensic Behavior Analysis
  • CRIM 2327 Victimology
  • CRIM 3625 Sex and Violence
  • PSYC 3648 The Criminal Brain
  • PSYC 3618 The Psychology of Child Witnesses
  • CRIM 2111 Juvenile Justice
  • CRIM 2610 Introduction to Forensics

Forensic Investigation is an overview of crime scene investigation, blood spatter examination, crime scene photography, fingerprint examination, ballistics, and criminal behavior.


What will I learn?

  • The importance of forensic evidence in the criminal justice system
  • The significance of eye witness testimony
  • The legal parameters of forensic investigation
  • The collection, presentation, and transportation of evidence to the laboratory

Where can I find jobs?

  • Federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), U.S. Secret Service, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
  • Medical Examiners' Offices
  • Law enforcement offices; private security firms; insurance companies

Contact: 
Rupendra Simlot, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G246, Phone: 609-626-6034, Email: rupendra.simlot@stockton.edu 

What courses do I need to take?

Foundation course requirements

  • Prerequisite: CRIM 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice and CRIM 2108 Courts, Law and Procedure
  • CRIM 2101 Criminal Procedure: Investigations
  • CRIM 2610 Introduction to Forensic Science
  • CRIM 3770 Advanced Forensic Science
  • CRIM 4870 Forensic Science Internship

Electives: Students must take TWO:

  • BIOL 1180 Functional Human Anatomy
  • BIOL/CRIM/ANTH 2400 Forensic Osteology
  • PSYC 3646 Forensic Behavior Analysis
  • PSYC 3648 The Criminal Brain
  • ENVL 3423 Entomology
  • PSYC 2211 Abnormal Psychology

Homeland Security is a set of courses that focus on terrorism, federal law enforcement, intelligence, military strategy, policing, national and global security, disaster management, and emergency preparedness.

 

What will I learn?

  • Terrorism and effective counter-terrorism strategies.
  • The role of government during disasters.
  • Political climates that bring about stability and instability.
  • Emergency response and policy regarding natural disasters/pandemics.
  • The role of security in protecting the population, civil liberties, and freedom

Where can I find jobs?

  • Federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), U.S. Secret Service, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
  • Medical Examiners' Offices
  • Law enforcement offices; private security firms; insurance companies

Contact: 
Susan Fahey, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G239, Phone: 609-652-4993, Email: susan.fahey@stockton.edu

Jess Bonnan-White, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: H227, Phone: 609-652-4453, Email: jess.bonnan-white@stockton.edu 

What courses do I need to take?

Foundation course requirements

  • (Prerequisite: CRIM 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice)
  • CRIM 2211 Terrorism
  • CRIM 2108 Courts, Law and Procedure
  • CRIM 3320 Homeland Security

Electives: Students must take TWO:

  • POLS 2190 Introduction to Public Policy
  • POLS 3313 The International Order
  • POLS 3221 Constitutional Law
  • CRIM 2101 Criminal Procedure: Investigations
  • POLS 2160 Introduction to Comparative Politics
  • POLS 2170 Introduction to International Politics
  • PUBH 2435 Fires, Flood, Famine: Communities in Crisis
  • ANTH 1100: Introduction to Anthropology

Certificates & Special Programs


The Dual BA/MA Degree Program in Criminal Justice is designed to offer students a broad, multidisciplinary and multidimensional perspective of the criminal justice system. Students will embark on an intensive academic experience for five years. This program includes all of the liberal arts courses that all Criminal Justice students at Stockton are expected to take, plus all the undergraduate and graduate core Criminal Justice classes.

Students have the choice of either completing the requirements for the Master's Degree as a generalist student, or they may choose to take courses to complete a track in Administration & Leadership, Forensic Psychology, or Homeland Security.

This is an intense program. To ensure the successful completion of the program working many hours outside of school is not recommended. New students may apply for dual-degree status by checking the box for dual degree on the admissions application.  Current Stockton students who are interested in switching to the dual degree program must contact the coordinator of the program, Dr. Marissa Levy. Once accepted into the program, students may decide to major in something other than Criminal Justice or graduate with a B.A. degree only, by notifying the Criminal Justice program and the University in writing.

 

Eligibility

Two types of students may apply for admission to the dual degree program:

  1. The first group consists of high school seniors who apply to Stockton. Students expressing an interest in majoring in Criminal Justice, who have earned a 3.3 GPA in highschool, who are in the top 20% of their high school class, and who have good SAT scores (minimum 1100 preferred) will be considered for early, conditional admission into the dual degree program. They will be issued letters of acceptance to Stockton University as undergraduate students and be given conditional admission to the dual degree program in Criminal Justice. Once enrolled at Stockton, students will have to maintain a GPA of 3.3 each semester in order to maintain their eligibility in the dual degree program. Criminal Justice students who are already enrolled at Stockton but were not admitted to dual degree as incoming freshman may apply to dual degree immediately following the completion of freshman year if they have maintained at least a 3.3 GPA each semester.
  2. The second group is transfer students. These students may apply for early, conditional admission if they have a GPA of at least 3.3 from their sending institution. Students will be expected to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 each semester in order to maintain eligibility in the dual degree program. The program will accept a maximum of 64 undergraduate transfer credits, but students with that many transfer credits will likely have to take either summer classes or an extra semester to graduate on time. (Students entering Stockton with an Associate's Degree will have 64 credits by the end of their sophomore year, but dual degree candidates will have completed or need to complete at least 68 credits by that time.) All students must complete their General Studies and non-social and behavioral science electives by the end of their junior year. By the time students begin to take graduate courses in their senior year, they should have at most six credits of cognates (social and behavioral science courses) remaining.

Fast Facts

Program Type: Full-time, accelerated 
Degree Offered: 
BA and MA in Criminal Justice
Program Length: 5 years (for students who enroll in freshman year); opportunities for transfer students, too
Total Credits: 164 credits for both degrees, with double-counting
Dual Degree Savings: 18 credits of undergraduate tuition and fees
Financial Assistance: Graduate Assistantships and scholarships are available

 

How to Apply?

Students apply as undergraduates through the Office of Enrollment Management as part of the regular freshman or transfer student admission process.  

Current Stockton students should contact Dr. Marissa Levy directly to determine eligibility.

Contact: Marissa Levy, Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G255, Phone: 609-626-6825, Email: marissa.levy@stockton.edu

The certificate program in forensic science is designed to provide a focus for those students who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science. This program is specially designed for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry or biology and for those who have already graduated but would like to pursue a career in forensic science by taking additional courses. Criminal justice majors may also complete the program. A student who completes the program will be knowledgeable about the criminal justice system, a systematic search at the crime scene, proper procedures for collection, packaging and preservation and transportation of physical evidence, methods of analysis of physical evidence using the knowledge of science and the significance of expert witness testimony.

Contact:
Rupendra Simlot, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G246, Phone: 609-626-6034, Email: rupendra.simlot@stockton.edu 

The Criminal Justice Internship Program is a cooperative effort between Stockton's Criminal Justice Program and public or private criminal justice agencies. Internships give students the opportunity to apply their Criminal Justice education to actual work situations. Students will apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to supervised work experiences at selected agencies, working under the supervision of both Criminal Justice faculty members and professionals in the field. Internships are available in the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters.

Students may earn up to eight (8) credits for internships at the undergraduate level. Students are required to complete 140 hours of service at the agency, keep a journal, and write a research paper during the internship semester in exchange for 4 credits, and 70 hours of service at the agency for 2 credits. Students will also be required to complete academic work, such as a journal of their daily activities at the agency and a research paper on the agency itself.

The application deadlines are as follows: Spring internship deadline is October 20, Summer internship deadline is March 1, and Fall internship deadline is May 1. An application must be completed and the background check paid for and initiated by that date in order to the eligible for the following semester’s internship.

Students will:

  • Gain practical, on-the-job experience in professional settings
  • Clarify career goals and assess readiness to enter a chosen profession
  • Integrate knowledge learned in the classroom with real-world employment situations

Requirements are:

  • Must be a CRIM major
  • Must have Junior or Senior class standing
  • GPA of 2.5 or higher
  • Have taken CRIM 2140 or 2141 (Research Methods) and passed with a C or better
  • Must meet all application deadlines
  • Must pay for and pass a criminal background check
  • Must meet any agency-specific requirements

Criminal justice students with a concentration in Forensic Investigations are required to meet the above requirements as well as having completed the required courses for the concentration. These students are required to work 280-300 hours in exchange for 4 credits.

Contact:
Susan Fahey, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Office: G239, Phone: 609-652-4993, Email: cjintern@stockton.edu

The Stockton CSI summer camp is designed to immerse high school students in the process of investigating a criminal case and bringing it to trial. Campers investigate a staged homicide scene, request forensic analyses on the evidence they collect, question witnesses, prepare a case for trial, and present the case in front of a mock judge and jury. Every step of the way, the campers learn from professionals in the field, including police investigators, criminologists, forensic psychologists, attorneys, medical examiner investigators, and corrections officers. There are also two field trips -- one to the county medical examiner's office and another to the county jail.

Contact:
Joshua Duntley, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G251, Phone: 609-626-3570, Email: joshua.duntley@stockton.edu

Christine Tartaro, Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G252, Phone: 609-626-6035, christine.tartaro@stockton.edu