Stockton Institute for Lifelong Learning

SCOSA is pleased to sponsor the Stockton Institute for Lifelong Learning (SILL), spearheaded by SCOSA Fellow and Associate Professor of Psychology Christine Ferri, Ph.D.  SILL's Spring 2021 offerings are listed below, followed by brief descriptions and biographies of the presenters. Space is limited, tuition is reasonable, and we hope to expand this programming that let you learn from and interact with Stockton’s accomplished faculty. For further information please contact SCOSA Director David.Burdick@stockton.edu, or Fellow Christine.Ferri@stockton.edu or call 609-652-4311.  

SPRING 2021 Programs

Each course (Four 1-hour sessions via Zoom) costs $45.

January  

Maple Sugaring:  A New England Tradition Comes to South Jersey!

Judith Vogel, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

Mariam Majd, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics 

Jessica Hallagan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Environmental Science 

January 8, 15, 22 & 29, Fridays 10 - 11 am   

February 

Protect Our Planet: Problems and Solutions

Patrick Hossay, Ph.D., Professor of Sustainability

Tait Chirenje, Ph.D., Professor of Environmental Sciences and Sustainability 

February 1, 8, 15 & 22, Mondays 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm 

 Introduction to Visual Literacy

Jedidiah Morfit, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Art (Sculpture)

February, 3, 10, 17 & 24, Wednesdays 2 - 3 pm

 

Music of African Americans

Beverly Vaughn, D.M., Professor of Music and Africana Studies

February, 4, 11, 18 & 25, Thursdays 1-2 pm

March 

Think Humanities, Act Creatively: An Environmental Humanities Overview  

Kristin J. Jacobson, Ph.D. Professor of American Literature, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, and American Studies  

March 1, 8, 22, & 29, Mondays 3 - 4 pm 

Optimal Brain Wellness: Current Research and Practical Strategies  

Christine Gayda-Chelder, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology    

March 4, 11, 18 & 25, Thursdays 1 - 2 pm 

April 

Reading Poems: Celebrating Spring and the Natural World 

Nancy Reddy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Writing and First-year Studies 

April 7, 14, 21 & 28, Wednesdays 3 - 4 pm  

 Click here for step-by-step instructions about registering for a course.

Course Descriptions

January 

Maple Sugaring:  A New England Tradition Comes to South Jersey! 

Judith Vogel, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

Mariam Majd, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics 

Jessica Hallagan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Environmental Science 

January 8, 15, 22 & 29, Fridays 10 - 11 am   

The production of maple syrup is a fun and fascinating process that spans multiple disciplines and multiple topics in the sciences. Whether interested in it as a hobby or as a potential source of income, this experiential short course will engage you in the process and science of maple syrup production from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will focus on the potential for maple sugaring in the South, showcase Stockton University’s USDA-sponsored research and the work being done at Stockton’s brand new, high-output sugarbush. Detailed instruction on tapping for the backyard enthusiast will be provided with a broader understanding of the obstacles facing the South Jersey producer.  This course will include an optional field trip to Stockton’s maple grove to explore the set up and implementation of the production site at the Stockton sugarbush.  

February 

Protect Our Planet: Problems and Solutions

Patrick Hossay, Ph.D., Professor of Sustainability

Tait Chirenje, Ph.D., Professor of Environmental Sciences and Sustainability 

February 1, 8, 15 & 22, Mondays 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm 

The fate of our survival, and that of the planet, is closely related to how we deal with the most pressing environmental challenges facing us. This course covers some of the major environmental issues we face: urbanization, water quality, air quality (including climate change), and loss of biological diversity and subsequently examines some of the most promising solutions, including alternative energy, smart community design, and electric vehicles.  The first two sessions will discuss how increased urbanization affects water recharge, traffic and commuting times as well as air and water quality. Our next two sessions will examine some of the most promising solutions to these challenges. Most notably, we will explore the possibilities of alternative energy generation, including solar, wind, biofuels, and others, as well as a look at the development of a smarter, more reliable and efficiency energy grid.

Introduction to Visual Literacy

Jedidiah Morfit, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Art (Sculpture)

February, 3, 10, 17 & 24, Wednesdays 2 - 3 pm

 

Never before in human history has communication been so inextricably linked with visual images. Every photograph that accompanies every article in every newspaper or magazine, every ad on TV or the internet, every package of every product in the grocery story, every photo on Instagram, every scene in every movie - they all have a job to do. They are all intended to tell a story, generate a response, or make an argument. This class will provide a very broad overview to how images do their work, and how we can be smarter and savvier consumer of the visual culture that surrounds us.

Music of African Americans

Beverly Vaughn, D.M., Professor of Music and Africana Studies

February, 4, 11, 18 & 25, Thursdays 1-2 pm

This course explores the development and influence of African Americans in the context of music-making in the United States. It surveys the West African musical influences as well as the growth of diverse genres of music ranging from spirituals to jazz, ragtime, soul, gospel, classical music, rap and hip-hop music with special emphasis on history, folklore and culture.

March 

Think Humanities, Act Creatively: An Environmental Humanities Overview 

Kristin J. Jacobson, Ph.D., Professor of American Literature, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, and American Studies  

March 1, 8, 22, & 29, Mondays 3 - 4 pm 

What does the humanities have to say about the climate crisis? How does the humanities help us “think globally and act locally”? This short course will overview the roles the humanities play in local and global environmental interventions. We will primarily focus on contemporary texts and contexts related to the United States but comparative examples will be included as well. Each week will introduce specific genres and disciplines, providing examples of how the humanities shapes and is shaped by environmental thinking: (March 1) environmental fiction and philosophy, (March 8) environmental art and history, (March 22) eco-popular culture and cultures of the extreme, and (March 29) environmental justice and film. A list of recommended titles to explore during or after the course as well as a short, optional full-text reading for each week will be provided electronically. 

 Optimal Brain Wellness: Current Research and Practical Strategies 

Christine Gayda-Chelder, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology    

March 4, 11, 18 & 25, Thursdays 1 - 2 pm 

Evidence-based research continues to demonstrate the power of lifestyle factors in maintaining and enhancing brain health. This course will cover the neuroscience and neuropsychology of how various lifestyle choices impact the human brain. The field of psychoneuroimmunology will also be highlighted. Students will design and develop their own “roadmap to brain health” to begin a personalized program of brain wellness that is realistic, practical, and enjoyable.

April 

Reading Poems: Celebrating Spring and the Natural World 

Nancy Reddy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Writing and First-year Studies 

April 7, 14, 21 & 28, Wednesdays 3 - 4 pm  

In this course, held in April for National Poetry Month, we’ll read poems about the natural world. After a tough 2020 and another winter of the pandemic, we’ll explore how poems can bring joy and wonder into our lives. We’ll read a range of contemporary poems, and the course will provide multiple entry points to reading and understanding poems. Whether you’re already an engaged poetry reader, or if you’re looking to explore something new, this course will have something for you.  

Stockton Institute for Lifelong Learning Faculty

 

Tait Chirenje 

I grew up in Zimbabwe (southern Africa) and I went to Hartzell High School and the University of Zimbabwe (graduated 1993). I moved to Canada in 1994 and completed my MS at the University of Guelph (Ontario). After two horrible winters I moved south where I completed my Ph.D. in trace metal geochemistry at the University of Florida (Go Gators!). After two years as a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Florida (worked on trace element baseline concentrations in all 67 FL counties) I moved to New Jersey in August, 2003. I have been teaching at Stockton University ever since. My hobbies include traveling, hiking, dancing (salsa, bachata, and other Latin dances). Recently I started doing more charity work (check out my Zimbabwe Book Project). Life's short, do the best you can. 

 Christine Gayda-Chelder 

Dr. Gayda-Chelder, Service Chair for the Stockton Center on Successful Aging, is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Coordinator of the Gerontology Minor.  She earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a subspecialty in Neuropsychology from Drexel University. Christine is a New Jersey Licensed Psychologist in private practice specializing in health psychology and neuropsychological assessment. She began teaching at Stockton in 1998 as an adjunct instructor.  Areas of research include coping with grief, caregiver burden, and the neuropsychological assessment of dementia.  

Jessica Hallagan

Dr. Hallagan grew up in Southern New Jersey and is a Stockton alumna. At Stockton, she majored in chemistry with a focus on environmental chemistry. During her years as a doctoral student at Virginia Tech, Dr. Hallagan was fortunate enough to spend a great part of her time hiking in the beautiful Appalachian Mountains. For her doctoral research, she studied soil science and examined inorganic soil biogeochemistry. Specifically, her graduate work investigated selenium geochemistry and bioavailability in phosphate mine soils in southeastern Idaho. She is eager to continue working with students through research and to instill the notion of the importance of soils and the environment through teaching.

Patrick Hossay 

Professor Patrick Hossay heads the Energy Studies and Sustainability programs at Stockton University where he teaches courses in automotive technology, green vehicle innovations, and energy science. He is also an experienced aircraft and automotive mechanic, and enjoys restoring classic cars and motorcycles.

Kristin Jacobson 

Kristin J. Jacobson’s book, Neodomestic American Fiction (Ohio State University Press 2010) examines twentieth- and twenty-first- century revisions of domestic fiction, a popular nineteenth-century genre. The book investigates the place of the home and domesticity in contemporary American literature and culture. She has also published articles in edited collections as well as in Genre, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, Legacy, and C21. She is the lead editor of the essay collection, Liminality, Hybridity, and American Women’s Literature: Thresholds in Women’s Writing (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).  Her current book project focuses on extreme forms of travel and nature writing, what Jacobson calls “adrenaline narratives.” She was Vice President for Development for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers (2010-2016) and a Fulbright scholar at Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Greece in Spring 2018.  

Mariam Majd

Dr. Majd, Assistant Professor of Economics, is a Stockton alumna who returned as faculty after earning a doctoral degree in Economics from the University of Massachusetts - Amherst. Her areas of expertise include international finance, money and banking and political economy.

Jedidiah Morfit

Jedediah Morfit graduated from Connecticut College with a degree in Religion Studies, and spent the next six years working as a freelance fabricator and illustrator. As an illustrator and designer, his work appeared in magazines that ranged from Forbes to Mother Jones, and his commercial client list included Microsoft and Coca-Cola. He received his MFA in sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2005, and joined The Richard Stockton College the following year. He was a Fellow at the Center For Emerging Visual Artists, in Philadelphia, from 2007-2009, awarded a New Jersey Council On the Arts Fellowship for sculpture in 2009, and won the Dexter Jones Award for Bas Relief from the National Sculpture Society in 2011 and 2012.

Nancy Reddy 

A native of Pittsburgh, Nancy Reddy earned her PhD in Composition and Rhetoric from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she also earned an MFA in poetry. At Stockton she teaches first year writing and creative nonfiction. Her research interests include writing pedagogy, archival research and extracurricular literacy's and writing groups. Her first book of poetry, Double Jinx, won the 2014 National Poetry Series and was published by Milkweed Editions in September 2015. She also has an article, co-written with Christa Olson, recently published in Literacy in Composition Studies.  

Beverly Vaughn

Beverly Vaughn, Professor Music and Vocal/Choral Program Coordinator, is a mezzo soprano, known for her velvety tone. She is native of Columbus, Ohio and a graduate of La Sierra University in Riverside, California with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish. Following graduation from La Sierra University, she completed both her Master of Music degree and Doctor of Music degree - both in voice performance-- at The Ohio State University where she studied primarily with Maestro Mario Alch.  Since coming to Stockton in 1982, she has won over 30 major awards and citations for her teaching, campus involvement and  community outreach.  Several of the most recent awards include the 2017 African American Student Alumni Award for the Outstanding Professor of the Year and the 2017 NAACP Achievement Award from the Mainland/Pleasantville Chapter. Other awards include several ARHU Teacher of the Year Awards, the Thomas Shavio Humanitarian Award from Beth El,  an Image Award from the Stockton Chapter of the NAAP,   the  Atlantic County Rotary Club Humanitarian Service Award for  Community Outreach,  the Outstanding Service  Award and the Merit Award from the Council of Black Faculty and Staff, Outstanding Contribution to the Arts Award from the New Jersey Arts Association, induction into the Atlantic County Women’s Hall of Fame and listed  4 times in Who’s Who Among College Teachers.

Judith Vogel 

Dr. Vogel is an alumna of Stockton University, graduating in 1993. She returned to Stockton as faculty in 2000 and currently holds the title of Professor of Mathematics. Dr. Vogel's training is in Numerical Linear Algebra, and her Ph.D. thesis is titled FQMR: A Flexible Quasi-Minimal Residual Method. Dr. Vogel participates in grant work centered on K-12 teacher preparation and has a focused research agenda in pedagogy. She is also an associate faculty member in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and is currently the coordinator of the Holocaust and Genocide undergraduate minor.