Criminal Justice

MACJ - Master of Arts in Criminal Justice

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Justice Studies Track
Admin & Leadership

 

                                     Alumni Testimonials       Faculty       Program Brochure   - Program Handbook

 

The Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (MACJ) Program at Stockton University provides a quality graduate program that promotes advanced inquiry and application of new knowledge and fosters advanced-level career opportunities. The program aims to serve criminal justice educational and research needs in the southern New Jersey area. Program faculty participate in research and service activities that benefit criminal justice and social service agencies locally, statewide, and nationally. The faculty's involvement in research and community affairs enhances the classroom experience, as faculty members are able to engage students in discussions of current dilemmas and controversies. The program provides students with the education needed to advance in the practitioner realm of criminal justice, but it also prepares those who want to continue with their education by giving them the research and analytic skills to pursue those goals.

Unlike other social science disciplines such as psychology and social work, there is no academic accreditation for programs in criminal justice. There is, however, optional certification. The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) offers certification for criminal justice and has developed approximately fifty standards as evidence of excellence in graduate criminal justice education. Stockton University's MA in Criminal Justice Program is the only graduate program in the tri-state area that has earned this certification. That means that we have provided evidence that we meet or exceed every single standard and that translates into an excellent education experience for our students. Students graduate from MACJ better prepared to work and lead in the criminal justice field, because they emerge from the program not just more knowledgeable about current criminal justice issues, but they are better writers, speakers, and critical thinkers. These skills are essential as our field matures and becomes more selective with hiring and promoting decisions.

Alumni from our program who have graduated with this track have moved on to work in a variety of criminal justice fields, including law enforcement, corporate security, and probation. Alumni from this track have also been accepted to Ph.D. programs.

Howard H. Berchtold, Jr.
Trial Court Administrator
Superior Court of New Jersey
Atlantic and Cape May Counties

Kellyn Bongiovanni, ‘12 (M.A. in Criminal Justice)
Probation Officer
Domestic Violence Unit
Cape May County Probation

Anne Crater
Chief Assistant Prosecutor
Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office

Joseph J. D'Angelillio
Founder/Chief Advisor
SecurEdge Advisors, LLC

Donna Higbee
Chief
Galloway Township Police Department

Stephanie Koch, MSW
Senior Vice President, Strategic and Business Development
JEVS Human Services

Amanda Leese, '08 (M.A. in Criminal Justice)
Regional Director
Safe Return
Volunteers of America Delaware Valley

Glenn Miller
Chief of Detectives
Ocean County Prosecutor's Office

Ed Moore
Administrative Officer
Investigation Bureau
NJ Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness

Claudia Ratzlaff
CEO
The Women’s Center

Laura Rodgers, LCSW
Chief Program Officer
Jewish Family Service of Atlantic & Cape May Counties

Edward F. Scott
Section Chief
TSA Training Center

Jacqueline Simonson
Victim/Witness Coordinator
Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office

Bradford N. Slutsky, ‘01 (B.A. in Criminal Justice)
Chief of Staff
Customs and Border Protection
Port of New York/Newark

Tracy Stuart
Sergeant
Stockton University Police Department

Henry White
Chief
Atlantic City Police Department

Dean Wyks, J.D.
Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice
Atlantic Cape Community College

 

The M.A. program in Criminal Justices is a 36 credit program and offers tracks in Administration and Leadership, Justice Studies, Forensic Psychology, and Homeland Security. Our program also offers students the option to do an internship, so they can gain first-hand experience working in criminal justice. The program welcomes both full-time and part-time students.  Most of our courses are offered during the evening, so students with full-time jobs may complete the program.

Stockton University is proud to now offer a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Program (MACJ) with a track in Administration and Leadership. This new track explores the daily challenges relating to leadership of individuals and organizations.

Individuals who want to further their education beyond the bachelor's degree but are not necessarily interested in the full master's degree have the option to enroll in the Criminal Justice Administration and Leadership Certificate.

 MACJ Curriculum- 36 credits

Mandatory Courses- 30 credits

CRIM 5206 Criminological Theory
CRIM 5214 Corrections
CRIM 5222 Victimology
CRIM 5315 Crime Data and Analysis
CRIM 5316 Graduate Research and Evaluation in Criminal Justice
CRIM 5250 Law Enforcement and Policing 
CRIM 5408 Criminal Justice Management and Leadership
CRIM 5410 Criminal Justice Policy and Planning
CRIM 5420 Judicial Process
CRIM 5460 Organizational Psychology

Elective Courses (choose two of the following courses or choose one and then take any other MACJ elective)- 6 credits
One elective in another MACJ track is permitted or a course in another Stockton graduate program is allowed with the Program Director's permission.

CRIM 5306 Geographic Profiling and Analysis
CRIM 5328 Cyber Crime
CRIM 5348 Drugs, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 5368 Crime and Place
CRIM 5509 Fundamentals & Theory of Emergency Management

CRIM 5540 Homeland Security Policy

OR one (1) of the following:
CRIM 5800 Independent Study
CRIM 5890 Advanced Independent Research and Publication
CRIM 5990 Graduate Internship

Stockton University offers a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Program (MACJ) with a track in Forensic Psychology.  The best way to understand forensic psychology is to examine the coevolution of the criminal justice system and the field of psychology. Both were very different in the past than they are today. The forensic psychology track in the Master's Program in Criminal Justice examines this coevolution. Students will explore how theory and research in the field of psychology has helped to shape our understanding of criminals and victims, definitions of crime, policing, courtroom procedures, corrections, and criminal laws, among others. The track emphasizes the importance of using research to understand how psychology can be best utilized by the criminal justice system.

There are numerous employment opportunities for those who wish to use psychology in the criminal justice system. Our alumni have found employment in the following fields:

  • Probation/Parole
  • Medicolegal investigator
  • Detective (prosecutor's office)
  • Correctional case manager
  • Victim's assistance advocate
  • Drug treatment caseworker
  • Child protective services specialist

With additional education, other career options include:

  • Certified drug and alcohol counselor
  • Clinical psychologists who evaluate criminals or counsel victims of crime
  • Clinical social workers who counsel and work to rehabilitate offenders
  • Psychologists who counsel police and corrections officers
  • Research psychologists who study
      • the psychology of criminals and victims
      • the psychology of police and corrections officers
      • confessions
      • courtroom procedures
      • eye witness testimony
      • expert witnesses
      • the penal system
  • Attorneys who use a background in forensic psychology enhance their effectiveness of their practice

Mandatory Courses- 33 credits  

CRIM 5206 Criminological Theory
CRIM 5208 Forensic and Legal Psychology
CRIM 5210 Forensic Psychopathology and Treatment
CRIM 5214 Corrections
CRIM 5222 Victimology
CRIM 5250 Law Enforcement and Policing
CRIM 5315 Crime Data and Analysis
CRIM 5316 Graduate Research and Evaluation in Criminal Justice 
CRIM 5348 Drugs, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 5420 Judicial Process
CRIM 5410 Criminal Justice Policy and Planning

Elective Course- 3 credits

Students may choose any MACJ elective. 

Stockton University offers a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Program (MACJ) with a track in Homeland Security. The program is designed to offer students a broad and multidisciplinary perspective on the criminal justice system. The work of criminal justice practitioners is complex and requires knowledge of how and why people engage in crime as well as an understanding of the issues faced by practitioners in the criminal justice system. Students may concentrate their studies in Forensic Psychology, Homeland Security, Justice Studies, or Administration & Leadership.

Federal, state and local government agencies, as well as private firms, are involved in protecting the United States, its people, and resources from human-made or natural disaster. The curriculum for the Homeland Security Track involves an all-hazards perspective, meaning that the program involves discussion about issues regarding the prevention of and reaction to natural and human-made disasters, including terrorist attacks. The legal, moral and ethical issues pertaining to homeland security will be an important component of the curriculum, as will studies of agency participation and cooperation in planning for and responding to crisis. The track will examine the history of terrorism and case studies of past and present terrorism campaigns from around the world. Students will graduate with a holistic perspective on challenges encountered in the fields of emergency management and counter-terrorism. Utilizing an interdisciplinary curriculum enables students to gain crucial knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential in this fast growing and complex field.

MACJ Curriculum- 36 credits

Mandatory Courses- 30 credits

CRIM 5206 Criminological Theory
CRIM 5214 Corrections
CRIM 5222 Victimology
CRIM 5250 Law Enforcement and Planning
CRIM 5315 Crime Data and Analysis
CRIM 5316 Graduate Research and Evaluation in Criminal Justice
CRIM 5410 Criminal Justice Policy and Planning
CRIM 5420 Judicial Process
CRIM 5505 Terrorism
CRIM 5509 Fundamentals and Theory of Emergency Management

Elective Courses  (choose two of the following courses or choose one and then take any other MACJ elective)- 6 credits
One elective in another MACJ track is permitted or a course in another Stockton graduate program is allowed with the Program Director's permission.

For course descriptions, please visit The University's Course Catalog. 

CRIM 5306 Geographic Profiling and Analysis
CRIM 5328 Cyber Crime
CRIM 5368 Crime and Place
CRIM 5408 CJ Management and Leadership
CRIM 5520 Legal Issues in Homeland Security
CRIM 5521 Borders

CRIM 5540 Homeland Security Policy

OR one (1) of the following: 
CRIM 5800 Independent Study
CRIM 5890 Advanced Independent Research and Publication
CRIM 5990 Graduate Internship

 

Stockton University offers a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Program (MACJ) with a track in Justice Studies. The Justice Studies Track allows students to study the field of criminal justice from a broad perspective. In addition to course work in the core, students may choose electives from all four MACJ tracks and one elective outside the MACJ program (with the Program Director's permission).

MACJ Curriculum- 36 credits

Mandatory Courses- 24 credits 

CRIM 5206 Criminological Theory
CRIM 5214 Corrections

CRIM 5222 Victimology
CRIM 5250 Law Enforcement and Planning
CRIM 5315 Crime Data and Analysis
CRIM 5316 Graduate Research and Evaluation in Criminal Justice
CRIM 5410 Criminal Justice Policy and Planning
CRIM 5420 Judicial Process 

Elective Courses (choose four)- 12 credits
One elective in another MACJ track is permitted or a course in another Stockton graduate program is allowed with the Program Director's permission.

For course descriptions, please visit The University's Course Catalog.

CRIM 5208 Forensic and Legal Psychology
CRIM 5210 Forensic Psychopathology and Treatment
CRIM 5225 Criminal Psychology & Profiling
CRIM 5306 Geographic Profiling and Analysis
CRIM 5310 Forensic Investigation in the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 5328 Cyber Crime
CRIM 5348 Drugs, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 5368 Crime and Place
CRIM 5408 Criminal Justice Management & Leadership

CRIM 5460 Organizational Psychology
CRIM 5505 Terrorism
CRIM 5509 Fundamentals & Theory of Emergency Management
CRIM 5521 Borders
CRIM 5540 Homeland Security Policy
CRIM 5800 Independent Study or
CRIM 5890 Advanced Independent Research and Publication or
CRIM 5990 Graduate Internship

 

 

Comprehensive Exam Information

Prior to graduation, students must pass the comprehensive exam.

The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess students’ knowledge of criminal justice issues. Students will need to pass twelve courses (the eight core courses and four electives) with a B or higher and pass all parts of the exam in order to graduate. Students should use information learned in the core courses to answer these questions, but they can also draw upon lessons learned in all of their classes and their own research to formulate answers.

For more information on the comprehensive exam process, students should refer to the MACJ Policies and Procedures Program Handbook.

Click on the important links below or view answers to frequently asked questions.

Sample Comprehensive Exam Questions

Video of Comprehensive Exam Q&A Session  

It is usually in late October in the fall and late February in the spring. The comprehensive exam is not administered during the summer session. The comp is offered during these times of year to make sure that there is time for the re-take for those who need to pass just one or two more sections. Both the comp and the re-take need to be administered and graded in time to allow students to submit their reflective essays. The reflective essays are due four weeks before the end of the semester, so the comp exams need to be finished and graded before that date each semester.
MACJ students are required to take the comprehensive exam to graduate.
The exam is four hours long, meaning that students will have approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes per section. There are three sections: Advanced Issues and Theories; Research and Quantitative Reasoning; and Policy and Administration.
During the first two weeks of the semester that you intend to take the comp, you must inform the graduate director in writing (email is sufficient) of your intention.

No, the purpose of the exam is to test your knowledge without the aid of any materials.

 

As you take classes, do all of your readings and keep your notes and books from your classes. The readings will help you learn about theories, different research methodologies or statistical tests, and different types of criminal justice policies and controversies. All of this may help you on the exam. For example, the reading that you do about a program that is being evaluated in your Research class might help you with formulating or critiquing a policy on the Policy/Admin question. An ethics issue that you discuss in Administration might wind up helping you answer the Advanced Issues question on the comp. As you read for Advanced Issues, think about what theories relate to the problems discussed in the readings. Even the readings for your track classes can be helpful for the exam, because you will be studying research, policies and administration issues in those classes.

If you are unclear about anything, go see your professors for help. There are several practice questions on the MACJ website for your review.

 

Don’t stress yourself with last-minute studying the night before the test. Relax, watch a movie, and then get some sleep. Eat a good breakfast before you come to the test.

When you take the comp, answer the questions! Read the questions carefully and make sure you answer what we are asking. If we are asking about a specific theory, don’t feel compelled to write a laundry list of all of the theories you know. If you are asked to set up a research design, make sure that your hypotheses actually address the research question. By the time you sit for the comprehensive exam, you should already (1) know the facts and terminology, (2) be a good enough writer to integrate your points into a paper that flows well, and (3) have enough critical thinking skills to be able to evaluate the merits of various arguments and research.

The comp is taken on the computer, and we will supply you with a flash drive. You may bring a pen or pencil so you can write on the back of the comp question sheet to make an outline. You won’t need a calculator and won’t be able to have a phone or any other electronic device out while you are working on the comp. 

You may print a copy of the exam for yourself at the conclusion of the exam if you would like to do so. 

Faculty members work in teams to write and grade the questions. When grading, faculty work together to agree on a grade. In the event of a disagreement that cannot be resolved, a third faculty member with experience in that subject will be asked to serve as a tie-breaker. Students will get an “A” for high pass, a “B” for pass, or a “C” for not pass on each section.

If you plan to re-take just the sections that you did not pass, you must do that the following semester; otherwise you will have to retake the entire exam at a later time. You must complete all of your classes (with a B or better) and pass all parts of the exam within the designated program completion time of six years from matriculation.

You will get 1 hour, 20 minutes if you are re-taking one section and two hours and forty minutes if you are re-taking two sections.

Three chances. Any third attempt at the comprehensive exam will be final. Students dismissed from the program after a third failure of the comprehensive exam may appeal to the Dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences for readmission.

Two Post-Master's Certificates, one in Homeland Security and, one in Forensic Psychology, are offered at Stockton through the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (MACJ) Program. These certificate programs were designed to serve the educational needs for homeland security professionals, mental health professionals, and law enforcement officials working with individuals with criminal backgrounds. A list of the ACJS Certified Programs throughout the United States is available here. The certification standards for MA programs in Criminal Justice are available here.

The Criminal Justice Administration and Leadership Certificate (CJALC) is a new program approved by the Stockton Faculty Senate. The CJALC was developed by the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (MACJ) Program at Stockton University with input from our External Advisory Board. The purpose of the certificate is to meet the need for education in the area of criminal justice leadership and administration. The program is for individuals who want to further their education beyond the bachelor's degree but are not necessarily interested in the full master's degree. The certificate will require students to take 15 credits, with three mandatory 3 credit courses and two electives.

The program has developed an option for students who show great academic promise in the certificate program to seamlessly transition into the full MA program if the students decide to continue their education. Students who decide to continue on to the MA degree will be able to apply all of their certificate credits to the MA. The program faculty generated the certificate courses listed below through a combination of our knowledge of the state of the field as well as consultation with the program's External Advisory Board.

Students who have completed four of the certificate courses, all with a B or better on the first attempt, and have a GPA of at least 3.5 in the certificate program may apply for Direct Entry to MACJ.  Students who meet these criteria and receive conditional admission to MACJ through Direct Entry will need to earn a grade of B or better in the final certificate course or face having the conditional admission rescinded.  Students not meeting these criteria may apply for MACJ through the traditional graduate admissions process.

All CJALC is open to MACJ Students and includes the following courses.

Mandatory Courses- 9 credits

CRIM 5408 Criminal Justice Management and Leadership
CRIM 5460 Organizational Psychology

Choose one of the following: 

CRIM 5214 Corrections
CRIM 5222 Vicimology
CRIM 5250 Law Enforcement and Policing 
CRIM 5420 Judicial Process

Elective Courses (choose two)- 6 credits

CRIM 5306 Geographic Profiling and Analysis
CRIM 5328 Cyber Crime
CRIM 5348 Drugs, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 5368 Crime and Place
CRIM 5509 Fundamentals and Theory of Emergency Management
CRIM 5540 Homeland Security Policy

The Forensic Psychology Certificate Program will serve as a conduit allowing those Masters-level professionals engaged in law enforcement and mental health to interact with one another, thus enhancing their understanding of the issues and complexities involved in both the rehabilitation process and the investigation of individuals who commit crimes.


To complete the Forensic Psychology Certificate program, students must successfully complete Forensic and Legal Psychology (CRIM 5208) and Forensic Psychopathology (CRIM 5210) and any three of the following:

CRIM 5222 Victimology
CRIM 5225 Criminal Psychology and Profiling
CRIM 5214 Corrections
CRIM 5245 Introduction to Counseling in the CJS
CRIM 5306 Geographic Crime Analysis and Profiling
CRIM 5310 Forensic Investigation in the CJ System
CRIM 5348 Drugs, Crime, and Criminal Justice
CRIM 5460 Organizational Psychology

For course descriptions, please visit The University's Course Catalog.

The Homeland Security Certificate Program will allow those who already have a MA degree to become familiar with issues such as disaster preparedness, security, terrorism, and crime analysis.


To complete the Homeland Security Certificate program, students must successfully complete Terrorism (CRIM 5505), Fundamentals and Theory of Emergency Management (CRIM 5509) and any three of the following:

CRIM 5306 Geographic Crime Analysis and Profiling
CRIM 5328 Cybercrime
CRIM 5368 Advanced Issues in Crime Prevention
CRIM 5408 CJ Management and Leadership
CRIM 5465 Leading in Crisis
CRIM 5518 The Intelligence Community and Homeland Security
CRIM 5535 Terrorism in the United States
CRIM 5540 Homeland Security Policy

 

 

Admissions Criteria

Application Deadline

Fall: July 1

Spring: December 1

Prerequisite Requirements

  • Completion of the following undergraduate courses: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Research Methods, and Statistics
  • Minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • Those applying for the certificate of graduate study or a post-master's certificate do not have to submit test scores

To be considered for admission to the MACJ program, applicants must submit the following prior to the deadline:

  1. Discover Stockton Online Application (you must create a Discover Stockton Account)
  2. Application fee: $50 (non-refundable), submitted with your online application
  3. Graduate application essay
  4. Three current letters of recommendation sent electronically via the Discover Stockton Application (2 recommended from faculty)
  5. Testing requirements (waived for students with a master's degree or GPA of 3.5 or higher)
  6. Resume
  7. Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended (including Stockton) mailed or dropped off directly to the Office of Graduate Studies

The Dual BA/MA Degree Program in Criminal Justice is designed to offer students a broad, multidisciplinary and multidimensional perspective of the criminal justice system. Students will embark on an intensive academic experience for five years. This program includes all of the liberal arts courses that all Criminal Justice students at Stockton are expected to take, plus all the undergraduate and graduate core Criminal Justice classes.

Students have the choice of either completing the requirements for the Master's Degree as a generalist student, or they may choose to take courses to complete a track in Administration & Leadership, Forensic Psychology, or Homeland Security.

This is an intense program. To ensure the successful completion of the program working many hours outside of school is not recommended. New students may apply for dual-degree status by checking the box for dual degree on the admissions application.  Current Stockton students who are interested in switching to the dual degree program must contact the coordinator of the program, Dr. Marissa Levy. Once accepted into the program, students may decide to major in something other than Criminal Justice or graduate with a B.A. degree only, by notifying the Criminal Justice program and the University in writing.

 

Eligibility

Two types of students may apply for admission to the dual degree program:

  1. The first group consists of high school seniors who apply to Stockton. Students expressing an interest in majoring in Criminal Justice, who have earned a 3.3 GPA in highschool, who are in the top 20% of their high school class, and who have good SAT scores (minimum 1100 preferred) will be considered for early, conditional admission into the dual degree program. They will be issued letters of acceptance to Stockton University as undergraduate students and be given conditional admission to the dual degree program in Criminal Justice. Once enrolled at Stockton, students will have to maintain a GPA of 3.3 each semester in order to maintain their eligibility in the dual degree program. Criminal Justice students who are already enrolled at Stockton but were not admitted to dual degree as incoming freshman may apply to dual degree immediately following the completion of freshman year if they have maintained at least a 3.3 GPA each semester.

  2. The second group is transfer students. These students may apply for early, conditional admission if they have a GPA of at least 3.3 from their sending institution. Students will be expected to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 each semester in order to maintain eligibility in the dual degree program. The program will accept a maximum of 64 undergraduate transfer credits, but students with that many transfer credits will likely have to take either summer classes or an extra semester to graduate on time. (Students entering Stockton with an Associate's Degree will have 64 credits by the end of their sophomore year, but dual degree candidates will have completed or need to complete at least 68 credits by that time.) All students must complete their General Studies and non-social and behavioral science electives by the end of their junior year. By the time students begin to take graduate courses in their senior year, they should have at most six credits of cognates (social and behavioral science courses) remaining.

Fast Facts

Program Type: Full-time, accelerated 
Degree Offered:
BA and MA in Criminal Justice
Program Length: 5 years (for students who enroll in freshman year); opportunities for transfer students catch up
Total Credits: 164 credits for both degrees, with double-counting
Dual Degree Savings: 18 credits of undergraduate tuition and fees
Financial Assistance: Graduate Assistantships and scholarships are available

 

How to Apply?

Students apply as undergraduates through the Office of Enrollment Management as part of the regular freshman or transfer student admission process.  

Current Stockton students should contact Dr. Marissa Levy directly to determine eligibility.

Contact: Marissa Levy, Professor of Criminal Justice Office: G255, Phone: 609-626-6825, Email: marissa.levy@stockton.edu

 

No. Holders of any undergraduate degree from an accredited institution can apply for this program. The only undergraduate courses that applicants must have prior to starting the program are Introduction to Criminal Justice, Research Methods, and Statistics.

Yes. Most courses are offered during the evenings.
No. However, because of the nature of the program, you are expected to have basic computer skills, such as word processing.

You may attempt up to three courses. To register for a course as a non-matriculated student, please complete the Online Graduate Student Non-Matriculated Registration Form.

Yes, the general GRE test is required for admission. The only students who are excused from the test are those who have an accumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.5 or higher or applying for a second M.A. degree. For more information about the GRE test and how to register, contact www.ets.org. Students should have their scores sent directly to Stockton (code 2889).
Yes, Stockton offers a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice. Our undergraduate students have the option of earning their degree without a track, or they may choose from one of the following tracks: Forensic Science, Forensic Psychology, Environmental Crime.
We anticipate that typical students will take two years to complete the program.
Students are strongly encouraged to take their core courses as soon as possible rather than taking most of the electives first. The core courses cover the foundations of criminal justice theory and research, and this information will be helpful for students when they are working on their electives.

Yes, you have three options:

  • Pursue an additional Master's Degree.
  • Apply to our Post-MA certificate program in Homeland Security or Forensic Psychology. The certificate programs are 15-credit programs.
  • You may take up to 9 credits as a non-matriculated student.

 

Criminal justice is a growing field in New Jersey and throughout the country. According to researchers from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics the outlook for several criminal justice occupations through 2012 is positive. The aggregate need nationwide is great, generated by the demand for employment in state and local government. The need for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists is expected to rise by 15 percent, resulting in an estimated 27,000 new jobs nationwide. The need for bailiffs, correctional officers and jailers is expected to rise by 24 percent, investigators 25 percent, and private detectives and investigators by 25 percent. Approximately 600,000 criminal justice job openings are expected in the aforementioned areas.

According to the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Labor Planning and Analysis Division, the Industry and Occupational Employment Projections indicate that education and training requirements (including a Master's degree) are on the rise in New Jersey. Projections indicate that by 2010 the need for a Master's degree will increase by 27.8 percent in Atlantic County, 24.5 percent in Ocean County, and 22 percent in Cape May County. These are the counties that are influenced most by the location of Stockton University.

The field of criminal justice does not have an accrediting body, so no graduate program in criminal justice in the United States is accredited. Stockton University is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The Master's Degree in Criminal Justice does not require separate accreditation.

Apply today. If you have further questions you can Request More Information or call the Office of Graduate Studies at (609) 626-3640 or E-mail gradschool@stockton.edu

Dr. Christine Tartaro
Christine.Tartaro@stockton.edu
Professor of Criminal Justice
Director, MACJ Program